Medicine Awareness Cheat Sheet.

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Furosemide is a compound that is medically utilized to treat hypertension and edema.  Both of these two complications can lead to congestive heart failure and Furosemide is used as a relatively safe and non-invasive first stage of treatment.  It is also one of several chemical agents utilized by athletes as a loop diuretic.  Athletes utilize diuretics for their “masking” quality to hide the effects of steroid and other illicit compounds in their system.  Diuretics increase the excretion of water from bodies and increase the amount of urination.  As Lampart mentions (2011) the increased urination reduces the amount of chemical markers left behind after other banned substances are administered (Para. 1).  According to Lampart (2011) the side effects of Furosemide are: dehydration, loss of sodium, dizziness, headaches, muscle cramps and thirst (Para. 3).  It can also lead to Hyperglycemia, low potassium levels, and gout.  As reported by Kessel (2011) a recent athlete that has tested positive for Furosemide is Jamaican Sprinter Steve Mullings (Para. 1).  Mullings tested positive for the substance just prior to the world championships in South Korea in 2011.  The failure was the second in his career after he previously tested positive for testosterone in 2004.  He was regarded as one of the three fastest men in the world and was hopeful of taking home a medal in the 2011 World Championships and this year’s Olympic games in London.  In November 2011 Mullings was hit with a lifetime ban from athletics for his second major drug offense.  The board vote was unanimous as he was seen as a repeat offender of rule violations.  Most diuretics are banned by all major sport organizations due to their substance masking effect.  The specific committee that penalized Mullings was the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

 

  1. Name of drug – Furosemide
  2. Brief background information – Utilized to treat hypertension and edema. Some athletes use the diuretics for masking the effects of steroid and other illicit compounds in their system. It increases the excretion of water from bodies and boosts the amount of urination.
  3. The side effects – Dehydration, loss of sodium, dizziness, headaches, muscle cramps and thirst, Hyperglycemia, low potassium levels, and gout.
  4. A player or athlete that tested positive – Jamaican Sprinter Steve Mullings
  5. The result the player faced from testing positive – Lifetime ban from athletics
  6. Type of drug – Diuretic used to mask the effects of anabolic steroids and other banned substances.
  7. What sport or organization (NCAA, NFL….) has a ban on your PED – International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

 

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Tetrahydrogestrinone, also known as THG or “the clear”, is a designer anabolic steroid compound closely related to Gestrinone and Trenbolone. It first came onto the market in 2000.  It is reported to have an amazing effect on both androgen receptors and the progesterone receptors, but not to the estrogen receptors.  The effect is all of the benefits of the increased androgen and progesterone with no estrogen based side-effects.  Based on this diagnoses, the drug is viewed as preferable to athletes looking to increase size, strength, and recovery.   It was originally an ideal choice for athletes looking to gain an advantage in competition because it was thought to be virtually invisible and undetectable in typical drug test.  In 2003, the USADA received a syringe with traces of the substance for testing and it was soon discovered and added to the banned substance list.  As reported by Cloe (2010) the drug can have devastating effects on male and female infertility, increased production of breast tissue in men, deepening of the voice in both men and women, loss of hair, increase episodes of hostile behavior, elevate LDL levels, decrease HDL levels, and cause acne (Para. 4-6).  British Sprinter Dwain Chambers tested positive for THG in 2003.  According to Knight (2004) Chambers was sentenced to a two year ban from athletic competition for his actions and a lifetime Olympic ban (Para. 1).  He was one of the first athletes found guilty of abusing the substance and served as an example to anyone looking to utilize the drug to gain an advantage in competition.  As of 2003, the majority of major sports organizations have included THG onto their banned substance list.  The specific organization that penalized Chambers was the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

 

  1. Name of drug – Tetrahydrogestrinone, THG or “The Clear”
  2. Brief background information – A designer anabolic steroid compound closely related to Gestrinone and Trenbolone. It first came onto the market in 2000. It is reported to have an amazing effect on both androgen receptors and the progesterone receptors, but not to the estrogen receptors. The effect is all of the benefits of the increased androgen and progesterone with no estrogen based side-effects.  Based on this diagnoses, the drug is viewed as preferable to athletes looking to increase size, strength, and recovery.
  3. The side effects – Can lead to male and female infertility, increased production of breast tissue in men, deepening of the voice in both men and women, loss of hair, increase episodes of hostile behavior, elevate LDL levels, decrease HDL levels, and cause acne.
  4. A player or athlete that tested positive – British Sprinter Dwain Chambers
  5. The result the player faced from testing positive –Chambers was sentenced to a two year ban from athletic competition for his actions (Para. 1) and a lifetime Olympic ban.
  6. Type of drug – Designer anabolic steroid
  7. What sport or organization (NCAA, NFL….) has a ban on your PED – International Olympic Committee (IOC).

 

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References

Cloe, A. (2010). Tetrahydrogestrinone Side Effects.  LiveStrong.com.

Retrieved from http://www.livestrong.com/article/255343-tetrahydrogestrinone-side-effects/

Kessel, A. (2011). Jamaican Sprinter Steve Mullings ‘Tests Positive’ for Banned Substance. The

Guardian.co.uk. Retrieved from

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2011/aug/11/jamaican-sprinter-steve-mullings-positive

Knight, T. (2004). Guilty Chambers Hit By Two Year Ban. The Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved from

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/drugsinsport/2373728/Guilty-Chambers-hit-by-two-year-ban.html

Lampart, L. (2011). Consequences of Diuretics in Sports. LiveStrong.com.

Retrieved from http://www.livestrong.com/article/491627-consequences-of-diuretics-in-sports/

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