Lucky Foods for the New Year

There are many New Year’s traditions around the world that have to do with food and the luck that it brings. Here are some of our favorites that you can include in your January celebrations!

  1. Grapes
    Courtesy of NPR.
    Courtesy of NPR.

    First on the list, grapes are primarily a New Year’s Eve tradition in Spain. At midnight, people try and eat twelve grapes at each stroke of the clock, symbolizing the months to come. This is a fun and exciting way to ring in the New Year!

  2. Cooked Greens
    C/o The Kitchn.
    C/o The Kitchn.

    Next, cooked greens, like the sauerkraut pictured above, represent economic fortune in the New Year. And if you’re not feeling the German take on it, Southern America likes collard greens as well. Also, if you’re vegan or vegetarian, it’s easy to take the meat out and flavor your greens with vegetable stock.

    C/o HormonesBalance.com.
    C/o HormonesBalance.com.

     

  3. Pomegranate
    C/o SousVides Supreme.
    C/o SousVides Supreme.

    Third, we have pomegranate, everyone’s favorite juicy winter fruit. In Greece, people smash a pomegranate on the floor at midnight, revealing how much prosperity the year will hold. The more seeds, the more luck you will have!

  4. Legumes
    C/o Organic Facts.
    C/o Organic Facts.

    Legumes (beans, lentils, peas) also represent economic luck, as their small shape and weight resemble coins. Legumes are also great, as they’re a vegan’s first choice for good protein!

    In Germany, Brazil, and Italy, you’ll find lentil dishes abound. Alternatively, in Japan, a sweet black bean dish will be the main spread. In the United States, you’ll find black-eyed peas, another southern tradition like the collard greens.

  5. Cake
    C/o Martha Stewart.
    C/o Martha Stewart.

    Various kinds of cakes are popular worldwide, with many different traditions along with them. In some cultures, like Mexico and Greece, a coin or other treats is hidden in the cake, and the person who finds it gets good luck. Sweden and Norway do the same thing with an almond!

    Here is a recipe for a vegan vanilla cake for you to try this New Years.

Katie Jeddeloh

Gastronomy Content Contributor

Katie Jeddeloh is a third year undergrad at St. Olaf College where she studies English and Women's and Gender Studies. Katie is an earth enthusiast and poet, and she loves growing, cooking, and talking about food.