Cool Facts Summer Issue 2015

F-numbers are actually written as they are due to human biology, or more specifically, due to the logarithmic nature of human perception.The story behind f-numbers actually begins in ancient Greece and has its roots in the brightness of stars. Source: petapixel.co

The f-number of the human eye varies from about f/8.3 in brightly lit conditions, to about f/2.1 in dark conditions. Source: digitalcameraworld.com

There are 12 Hasselblad cameras on the surface of the moon. They were left there after the moon landings to allow for the extra weight of the lunar rock samples to be brought back. Source: digitalcameraworld.com

Amusing photographs of cats with captions (see icanhascheezeburger.com) quickly became (and remained) viral on the internet. Apparently this is nothing new. One of the first photographers of cats in amusing poses was English photographer Harry Pointer during the 1870s. He began his career taking natural pictures of cats, but soon realized that his photography had more success when the cats were in ridiculous poses. He even added captions to the images, such as ‘Happy New Year’, ‘Five o`clock Tea’ and ‘Bring up the dinner Betsy’ as he found this made the images more successful still. Source: photohistory-sussex.co.uk

Before the digital age, the US government was taking spy photographs of the Soviet Union. How did they do this? They launched 20 satellites, each containing 60 miles of film along with cameras. After the film was finished, it was shot back through the Earth’s atmosphere in buckets and parachuted over the Pacific Ocean, where they were then snagged with grappling hooks by C-130 Air Force planes. Source: theatlantic.com

Manhattanhenge (also known as Manhattan Solstice) is a phenomenon whereby the setting sun aligns with Manhattan’s east-west streets. It gives a dramatic effect which has been compared to the same phenomenon at England’s ancient Stonehenge (hence the name). It is a favorite event for people to photograph in New York when it occurs. Source: digitalcameraworld.com

Cameras and guns share a common history – in the early days of cameras being manufactured, some dry plate cameras were explicitly modelled on Colt revolver mechanisms, and the design of cinema cameras was modelled on machine guns. Closer still, when William Walker and George Eastman of Kodak developed a new paper negative, it used guncotton. This was expanded upon by a French inventor who created a gelatinized guncotton that could be cut into strips, which in turn permitted the first modern smokeless fun powder. Later on, amyl acetate was added to this, as well as nitroglycerine and acetone. So essentially, at the time, cameras and guns both contained the same sort of chemicals in their cartridges. david-campbell.org /Via digitalcameraworld.com

The largest collection of cameras in the world is held by Dilish Parekh of Mumbai, India. He has a collection of 4,425 antique cameras which he has been collecting since 1977. Source: Guinness World Records

The total number of photos on Facebook is 10,000 times more than the total number of photos in the U.S. Library of Congress, which document U.S. history since the beginning of time. Source: iStockphoto

You can test your camera’s shutter speed using a TV or monitor. Apparently it works for both focal plane and leaf type shutters. This diagram shows you what you should be looking for. Source: rick_oleson.tripod.com

The longest photographic negative in the world is 129 feet and was created by Esteban Pastorino Diaz. The negative is of a panorama of major streets in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The images were captured by the slit camera, which was mounted to the roof of a moving car. Source: Guinness World Records

In a survey undertaken last year, 76 per cent of people from Britain were seen to be drunk in photos in which they were tagged. (Perhaps many of those people were celebrating winning a pub quiz on photography. Via: Telegraph).

The biggest SLR lens made to date is the Carl Zeiss Apo Sonnar T*. It weighs 564lb/256kg and has a focal length of 1700mm. It is designed specifically for use with a Hasselblad 6×6 medium format camera, and was custom-build for an anonymous customer who had a particular interest in wildlife photography. Source: Zeiss

The first color photograph was taken in 1861 by James Maxwell, a British physicist. Source: eurogallery.org

Viorel Iliescu

Web Developer & Marketing Manager at Trend Prive Magazine. Very kind and humanitarian.